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if constant budget deficits are going to ruin the economy they're taking an awful long time about doing so. the real fact about the budget is that the deficit has to be sustainable. but basically the government is a lot more like a company than it is like a household. and a company has debt as part of its permanent capital structure and it can have that debt forever. if the company keeps grog, it can take on more debt. similarly if we run a budget deficit, so long as it is small enough relative to the amount of economy is growing over the long-term that can be sustainable. we have to shrink the budget deficit over time, but not all the way to zero. the democrats are closer to correct on this point where the republicans have been attacking them because their budget doesn't balance over ten years. the budget shouldn't balance over ten years. >> i think you hit a key point. it's all about growth. you can grow your way out of deficits. we saw it during the clinton administration. it's also about looking at how far we've come. if you actually look at what we've already done in terms of getting
the sequester for the moment maybe don't do anything. the economy looks like it's picking up a little steam. and that might be just what we need. you know, in terms of the ryan budget, it took a public drubbing in the election. we, we already forgotten about november? when the republicans ran on the ryan budget. if they want to keep revisiting that, that's their choice. but why are we talking about this? we just find out that medicaid and medicare deliver health care cheaper than anything else? and they want to eviscerate that? it makes utterly no sense at all to me, anyway. >> howard, these seem to be sort of political manifestos, more than fiscal proposals. especially the ryan budget, over 40% of its savings are based on a repeal of obama care. which ain't going to happen any time soon. >> i agree, they are political. they aren't even opening negotiating positions, sometimes people set out markers that are designed to begin negotiations. these are political documents and they're speaking to their own parties. and the democrats have already said, look, you want to run on the ryan budget ag
, interest rates are extremely low right now. there's a lot of unused productive capacity in the economy. there is disagreement over whether you could continue to run the deficits. so, you know -- i don't want to say there's no disagreement. people do disagree over this, and that's the problem that washington hat right now. everyone says we have to cut, we have to cut. that's the problem with the murray budget. it goes way too far toward the republicans. if unfortunate the sharp debate that schumer is talking about, debate the progressive budget, which actually adds spending and stimulus against the ryan plan. >> we haven't cut spending, have we? seriously. can we at least try that and see whether or not all of this -- but that's not cutting spending. you're still spending the money, judd forestalling where you will make the payment. >> it's still growing. >> spending in this country is still growing. it's a contingent and sane argument to make that we need to address it from that side first. we gave you the $600 billion in new taxes, you want more, you want more spending. >> paul ryan w
by the time we came into office in 2009, it was all about the economy. but the animating event really for three years, leading up to that election, was iraq. i definitely think, i think it is, i think it will have a huge impact, it has on this commander-in-chief and will have on future commanders in chief. because they understand that without some popular support, it's hard to go about doing -- a lot of military action. without some broad popular support among people to do something like this, there's very little taste to park tens of thousands of people in a place like syria. that even though it's important, has less of a connection to folks here at home. they understand now probably more than ever, the real costs of the war. not just in dollars, but in lives and in injuries and in things like ptsd, which we'll quite frankly be dealing with for a lifetime. >> rachel i want to talk about the veterans' angle on this and we speak about the cost of war. we often forget about those still living if you're look at what's happening to veterans, there are 600,000 of veterans who have backlog
that ben was talking about. what is the impetus, what is the reason when their economy is doing relatively well, when there are relatively few threats ostensibly from the palestinians, because people aren't dieing in the same numbers as a few years ago, what is the impetus of making a deal right now and having those difficult compromises and moving those settlers outth and on the palestinian side, why not have a third intifada, this isn't moving. there is a very short timeframe here for the president and the israeli leadership to try to move the needle and move a peace process into gear. and we don't really see anything beyond some very fine outreach an very fine speeches. because there are other strategic realities, notably iran and syria yet again. the palestinian conflict, the palestinian situation, is right at the bottom of everyone's list. >> ben, you're in tel aviv. tell us how the president is being received. i mean we went through the headlines and the sort of love fest and the matching outfits that bebe and the president were wearing yesterday. but in terms of the people on the gr
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5